Words Like Raindrops

Last week in my blog about Goals, Guilt, and Writer’s Remorse I mentioned that I have a daily word count goal of 2000 words.  To me that seems like a modest goal, but I had a few comments from people about how amazing it was that I could write that much in one day.  I’ve been thinking a lot about that, trying to get a handle on what it is about words that allows some people to be more speedy or prolific than others.  I’m sure there are a thousand different answers to that question, as many answers as there are writers, in fact.  But one of the conclusions I came to involves an old fashioned skill that I was forced to learn in eight grade: typing.

To me the fascination of typing began in a deep, emotional part of my childhood.  My Mom was a secretary.  Old school secretary.  She was also a single mother raising two kids without a lot of money.  There were times when I had to hang out in her office until she could take me home or find someone to watch me.  This was, of course, made a thousand times easier by the fact that she was the secretary of the elementary school that my brother and I attended.  Hanging out in her office was what a bunch of kids did while waiting for their parents.  I, of course, loved it.  Most of all I loved and was fascinated by the sound of her typing.

My Mom typed like the wind.  She typed like the rain.  This was the mid-80s we’re talking about.  She had one of those old electric typewriters with a ball of letters thing in it.  The sharp drumming of words being struck onto paper at a thousand miles per hour filled me with a sense of peace and amazement in a world that was shifting under my feet.  Sometimes I would stand where I could watch the letters spilling out through the raindrops of keystrokes just to see the miracle of words being created.  As technology advanced she moved to a word processor and one of the old clicky keyboards, but somehow the magic continued.  My Mom could produce words as fast as I could read them.

That was the key.  I used to insist on writing all of my stories with pen in a notebook.  My handwriting deteriorated the longer and faster I wrote, but I was convinced that it was the only way to keep the flow.  Because I couldn’t type for beans.  Well, eventually I reached the point where I knew that wasn’t going to cut it.  I had to learn to type like my Mom.  I had seriously old fashioned typing classes using manual typewriters that looked and smelled like they came from the 1960s when I was in eighth grade, but it wasn’t until I was in college really that I got serious about typing.

Mario taught me to type.  I was working as a teacher’s aide in the special ed department of my old high school.  We had a Mario typing program that we had the kids use when they had some free time.  I took the discs home after school for a while and buckled down.  The idea of the program was that you, as Mario, had to hit the right letters or numbers to defeat the bad mushrooms, or whatever they were, that came at you with increasing speed.  At least I think that’s how it worked.  I played that game for hours!  And I got really good at hitting the right key without looking at the keyboard.  I did not, however, learn to hit the right keys with the right fingers.  To this day if a typing purist were to watch my hands while I type they would probably have a coronary.  But it gets the job done.

I can now type at the speed of my thoughts.  Well, maybe not that fast, but pretty close.  Certainly far faster than I can write things out by hand.  It comes in incredibly handy when I’m in the throes of a particularly deep scene.  There are times when I start typing so fast, when the ideas and images and dialog are coming so fast, that I forget I’m even typing.  I’m just creating.  I also have Word set to auto-correct all of my typical stupid misspellings.  So off I go, thoughts spilling out onto paper at miracle speed!

My Mom passed away ten years ago this last April after an eight year battle with breast cancer.  I will never be able to type as fast as she could.  But when I sit down at my computer with my relatively soft and quiet keyboard and really get going I can feel a hint of her and her rainstorm typing.  The sound of my keys reminds me of her, just like the image in the mirror as I get older bears more and more of a resemblance to her.  She didn’t live long enough to see my silly scribblings turn into pages and books that people actually want to buy.  But I know that she’s proud of me nonetheless, sitting up in Heaven typing miracle words like raindrops.

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5 thoughts on “Words Like Raindrops

  1. Beautiful thoughts about the writing process. Getting the words to appear on paper (now screen) still seems magical to me, too. I learned to type with Mavis Beacon, as alas, I, too had the terrible typing class in 9th grade where my fingers got stuck in between the keys.I squeaked through with a C-. Fifteen wpm….those were the days. 🙂 Thanks for this thoughtful post.

    • Thanks Kristin! =D

      Once upon a time when I was learning about runes and other early alphabets I read that people originally thought physical writing was magic because it spoke the words of people who had been long dead. I can absolutely see how that’s true!

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